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Noisy Water Winery

Hannah Perry
 
January 15, 2021 | Hannah Perry

The Ultimate Duo

 
 

A Guide To Pairing Wine & Cheese

 
 

THE SCIENCE

 

Science tells us that pairing foods and beverages that taste similar to one another improves the experience and that the similarities compliment one another, but the opposite can also be true! The fat in cheese and the acidity in wine compliment each other because of that very fact- they are opposites! The different compounds of cheese and wine creates a balanced and pleasing "mouthfeel," which refers to the way foods feel in the mouth. No wonder cheese and wine pair so perfectly!

 

OUR FAVORITE PAIRINGS:

 
 
Feta
$10.00
 
 
 
 
 
Time Posted: Jan 15, 2021 at 10:03 AM
Sam Freed
 
November 21, 2020 | Sam Freed

Sweet Temptation is Back!

 
 

Just in time for the Holidays, one of our Double Gold Medal Winning Port-like wines is finally back in bottle!

We've given this award winning port a new look and you're going to be tempted to leave with cases!

The Wine!
 

Inspiration:

This "Port-Like" fortified wine is going to tempt you to leave with cases! We have taken Barbera and Dolcetto grapes and infused them with brandy for a dark and fruity traditional port-like wine.  

 

Taste:

Cherry notes, slight raisins, vanilla and a hint of chocolate for a smooth velvety finish.

 

Wine Specs

VINTAGE Non Vintage

VARIETAL Barbera/Dolcetto

APPELLATION New Mexico Vineyards

SUGAR ≈25 Brix at Harvest

ALCOHOL % 19.5

PRODUCTION 135 Cases

Awards

Double Gold – 2017 Finger Lakes International

Gold Medal – 2016 NM State Fair

Best of Show – 2016 NM State Fair

 

 
Time Posted: Nov 21, 2020 at 9:00 AM
Hannah Perry
 
November 15, 2020 | Hannah Perry

Holiday Wine Guide

 
 

 

BUYING WINE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

 

A Field Guide Pt 1

 

THANKSGIVING DINNER

 

There are 4 components that traditionally go into a Thanksgiving dinner:

  1. PROTEIN: Turkey or ham
  2. ROASTED DISHES: Green bean casserole, or anything baked in the oven
  3. DRY SPICES: Cinnamon, clove, dried herbs
  4. WINTER FRUIT AND VEGETABLES: Squash, Brussel sprouts, onion, cranberry and potato

 

When you start to think about all of the ingredients that go into making Thanksgiving dinner, you begin to eliminate wines that possess flavors that are opposite of the flavors you would taste in your feast! Ideally, the goal is to match similar or complimenting flavors found in your meal and in wine! A dry red wine, for example, mirrors those similar flavors like nutmeg and dark fruits that are more in line with the flavor profiles in the entree of your meal.

 

We recommend a Pinot Noir, Zinfandel or a Barbara/ Gamay blend:

 

ON TO DESSERT

 

Pumpkin Pie is a staple dessert at Thanksgiving and is the perfect fall holiday treat. The mulling spices and honeyed fruit flavors found in sweeter white wines pairs up well with the rounder flavor of pumpkin and can handle the fall spices.

 

We recommend the 2019 Moscato and 2019 Gewürztraminer

 

Don't gamble on a cute label at the grocery store: keep your wine rack stocked with your favorite small producer!

 


Cheers!

Hannah Perry
 
November 12, 2020 | Hannah Perry

How To Taste Wine & Develop Your Palate Like a Pro

How to Taste Wine Like a Pro

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4 Steps to Tasting Wine:

 

1: LOOK. Give your glass of wine a visual inspection in neutral light. Check out the color, opacity and viscosity.

 

2: SMELL. Identify aromas by swirling your wine 3 or 4 times to let the aromatic compounds of the wine mix with the air. Think big to small. Ask yourself are there fruits? What kind of fruits? Tropical? Orchard?

  • You can divide the aroma of a wine into three separate categories: Primary Aromas are where you find fruit, herb and floral notes. Secondary Aromas originate from winemaking practices (fermentation, etc). And Tertiary Aromas come from aging, usually in a bottle or an oak barrel. These aromas are mostly nutty, vanilla, baking spices and cedar.

 

3: TASTE. Assess the taste structure of the wine. Is it sour, sweet, bitter? Pay attention the the texture of the wine. We perceive wine as richer than water and we can also detect tannins with our tongues, which is that drying sensation you get from dry red wines. When tasting wine, there is a beginning, middle and end finish, so focus in on how the wine tastes as it moves through your mouth.

 

4: THINK. What conclusion have you drawn about the wine? Was it unique or memorable? Were there any characteristics that stood out to you?

 

Let's put the 4 steps to the test.

 

2016 Curtain Call

 
  $40.00

1. LOOK. Deep purple color. Saturation and density are heavy and is full-bodied.

 

2: SMELL. Heavy dark orchard fruit. Primary aroma of black cherry and tertiary aromas of vanilla.

 

3: TASTE. Pitted fruits and blackberries. Silky smooth beginning and mid-palate, finishes bone dry.

 

4: THINK. The deep and dark fruits are complimented by a slight vanilla aroma and flavor which balances the flavors. Perfect wine to pair with performing arts, or any reason for a curtain call.

 

 

Don't gamble on a cute label at the grocery store: keep your wine rack stocked with your favorite small producer!


Cheers!

 

 
Hannah Perry
 
November 5, 2020 | Hannah Perry

Beaujolias

 

 

N U E V O  N O U V E A U

30 million bottles of wine are shipped out around the world within 60 days of grape harvest from eastern France’s Beaujolais region.

 

Released on the third Thursday of November at 12:01 a.m. every year since 1951

Sound impossible? Hardly. We have a bottle just for you.

 
New Beginnings
 

As the name implies, Nuevo (Beaujolais) Nouveau, is "new" - young, that is - and is bottled less than two months after crushing the grapes.

 

In the 1950s, winemakers began competing each year in a race to deliver the first bottles to Paris, and before we knew it the competition had been pushed and publicized enough that the harvest and distribution of this wine is now celebrated all over the world at exactly midnight on the third Thursday of November, when it is legal to pop a bottle open.

Taste

 

Fresh, youthful and vibrant with lush, juicy aromas of grape, raspberry, fig, banana, and cranberries. This is as close as you can get to drinking wine straight from the vine.

 

Pairing

 

A superb match for turkey, right in time for Thanksgiving.

$29.00
 
 
 
Chelsie Pickard
 
June 3, 2020 | Chelsie Pickard

A Quick Guide To Removing Wine Stains

The saying goes "don't cry over spilled milk." But spilled wine is definitely a cause to be at least a little bit sad! Your precious vino is wasted, and it's probably stained something you care about like your clothes, your couch, or (even worse) your white carpet. Luckily, we've got a few tricks up our sleeve to help you get rid of those stubborn stains. 

General Cleaning Tips
 
Don't scrub, blot! Scrubbing can cause the stain to absorb even further, while blotting removes additional wine before you begin cleaning. Blot the stain with a paper towel or rag until no more residue comes off. 
 
Don't let it sit! As tempting as it may be, try not to let the stain sit before you begin cleaning. The longer it sits, the harder it will be to remove.
 
Don't throw in the towel...literally! It might be tempting to give up, especially if you're trying to clean white wine (which can be peskier to remove although the pigments aren't as vibrant). Keep blotting, cleaning, and repeating and you'll eventually succeed!
Removing Red Wine Stains
 
Salt: Salt is especially helpful when removing red wine stains from couches, rugs, or carpet. After blotting, cover the stain with a generous amount of salt. Once the salt soaks into the wet wine, let it dry completely. It should absorb the stain once dry. Then, vacuum up the salt residue. 
 
Dish soap and hydrogen peroxide: Mix a solution of 1/2 dish soap and hydrogen peroxide. Pour the solution over the stain and let it soak. Then rinse, blot, and repeat until clean.
 
Baking soda and water: Create a paste by mixing three parts baking soda and one part water. Apply to the stain and vacuum once dry. 
Removing White Wine Stains
 
Cold water and laundry detergent: This method works great for items you can't throw in the wash. Pour cold water over the stain and blot with a rag covered in laundry detergent (the liquid kind works best). Repeat until the stain is removed.
 
Dishwashing detergent, white vinegar, and water: Mix one part liquid dishwashing detergent with one part white vinegar and two parts warm water. Sponge the mixture onto the stain until it is removed. Then, sponge with cold water and blot the area until dry.
Hopefully you don't need to use these methods, but if they come in handy that probably means you need some more wine...we happen to know where you can get some
NEED RED?
NEED WHITE?
Amy Bennett
 
May 18, 2020 | Amy Bennett

Wine Of The Week - Amor En Fuego

 
Only in New Mexico does pairing red chile and chocolate make as much sense as pairing peanut butter and jelly or rum and coke. While some people raise an eyebrow at the idea, they think this is something that is better suited to the making of candy, or hot chocolate, or maybe even a sauce for chicken.

Then along comes Noisy Water Winery and says, “Hey! How about making red chile and chocolate WINE???”

Amor En Fuego is literally translated as “love on fire”. And if you love red chile, chocolate, and wine, you’ll understand how this wine got its name. With hints of berries and toasted marshmallow on the nose, and a rich velvety middle of milk chocolate, cinnamon, and vanilla, finishing with a spicy red chile kick (but not too spicy!), this wine is a perfect complement to an appetizer course loaded with fruits and cheeses or as a dessert with a rich cheesecake or anything sweet and creamy like tres leches cake. Or pair it with something dark and chocolatey, like brownies.


Amor En Fuego (Red Chile & Chocolate Wine)
Amor En Fuego (Red Chile & Chocolate Wine)
$24.00

This New Mexico red chile and chocolate infused wine, will have you reminiscing on times spent in grandma’s kitchen!!   
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While it makes a delicious and intriguing dessert wine on its own, it can also be used to liven up hot chocolate or coffee. Or, freeze Amor En Fuego into cubes and use it to make a deliciously boozy iced coffee! Dress it up with a dash of cinnamon or red chile powder! You can also substitute it for any liquid in brownie or cake recipes to add a subtle, extra flavor dimension.

Whether served by itself or used to enhance a favorite stand-by recipe, you’ll be sure to add a little New Mexico flavor and mystique to your glass and table by including Noisy Water’s Amor En Fuego to your selection of great wines from the Land of Enchantment!

“To love is to burn, to be on fire.”
— Jane Austen

Amor En Fuego
 
Amy Bennett
 
May 11, 2020 | Amy Bennett

Wine Of The Week - 2017 Barrel Select Mourvèdre

 
I've said before that, up until about ten years ago, I was a complete wine novice. I knew there was red wine and white wine and, for the most part, I didn't like either one of them. They were “too dry” – at least, the first of each in my limited experience. And that, as far as I was concerned, told me everything I needed to know about wine. I would tolerate a glass for the sake of convention (because grown-ups drank wine with their dinner) but the idea of actually enjoying a glass of wine was laughable. 

I had no idea that wine ran the gamut from excruciatingly sweet to mouth-puckeringly acidic and dry. And somewhere in between, I would find my comfort zone. 

My husband came to an appreciate dry, tannic red wines much sooner than myself who had graduated from Moscato to Sauvignon Blanc, but he urged me continually to expand my horizons. However, my palate hadn't quite attained the level of appreciation for strong tannins that his had; consequently, I often retreated to my safety zone of dry white wines and concluded that I wasn't cut out to enjoy dry reds. Then, in 2018, Noisy Water Winery released their Mourvèdre.

A grape that originated in Spain and is now grown in France, Australia, and the United States. Mourvèdre – a wine I had never heard of, and like all wines in the Noisy Water catalog, I had to learn about it. Which meant drinking it. 


2017 Barrel Select Mourvedre
2017 Barrel Select Mourvedre
$38.00

The road less traveled in winemaking: first-growth fruit from a premier vineyard
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Dark fruit and floral notes in the nose enticed me to take a sip. It was velvety on the tongue with hints of black pepper and herbs, perfect for a cool winter night and easily paired with any dish of Mexican or Italian food, especially something with a rich tomato base. And though it was a dry, full-bodied red wine, I was pleasantly surprised by the smoothness of the finish. It's just as easy to drink with good friends and conversation on a warm summer evening. Mourvèdre has encouraged me to step fearlessly into trying something new and expecting to be pleasantly surprised in the process.

So don't let a “dry red wine” label intimidate you... there's a wine for every palate and sometimes it's what you least expect. Try a bottle of our 2017 Barrel Select Mourvèdre and prepare to be excited to explore more dry red wines!

“The best way to learn about wine is in the drinking.”
- Alexis Lichine, American wine dealer and writer (1913–1989)

2017 Barrel Select Mourvèdre
Amy Bennett
 
May 4, 2020 | Amy Bennett

Wine Of The Week - El Cabron Viejo

 
Anyone with the most rudimentary knowledge of the Spanish language can understand why the name of this wine raises eyebrows in our tasting rooms.

Literally translated, El Cabron Viejo, “the old goat”, conjures up images of a crusty curmudgeon, and Noisy Water Winery’s Old World-style blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot seems to fit the image of a wine that is best served in antique crystal goblets in a dark, musty library while perusing a copy of “The Milagro Beanfield War” by John Nichols. Winemaking can be a science, but it is just as much an art and no winemaker truly KNOWS how a wine will develop. And like a wine lover’s version of a Cracker Jack box, there’s something unexpected in a bottle of El Cabron Viejo!

Notes of dark cherry, leather, and a hint of pepper fill the nose, suggesting a truly dry, tannic experience, but then one sip and… surprise! Like the grumpy old man who’s really all heart under that gruff exterior, El Cabron Viejo glides like velvet over the palate to an astonishingly mellow finish. Even novice wine drinkers who typically shy away from anything dry and heavy on tannins will be able to appreciate the smoothness of this blend. It’s a great place for them to start exploring dry, full-bodied red wines.


El Cabron Viejo
El Cabron Viejo
$24.00

A sweet peppered nose and light spiced finish makes this limited reserve perfect for all you "CABRONS" out there! 
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While dry red wines are typically consumed more often in the winter time, this blend is easy to drink year round. The bold flavor, enhanced by the fruity, peppery nose, makes this an excellent wine to pair with barbecue or anything else you can throw on the grill, though it’s equally at home with a prime rib dinner or any kind of meat with a rich, flavorful sauce. 

First released in 2014, El Cabron Viejo has evolved over the years from different blends, according to the availability of certain varietals and the winemaker’s personal whims, but it has always remained a customer favorite in the tasting rooms and at festivals. Once the initial gasp of disbelief upon being introduced fades away, the whimsical name encourages tourists to take it home as a souvenir for their favorite, ahem, “cabrones”… husbands, dads, fathers-in-law, and even bosses. 

One sip will be sure to charm the whiskers off any “old goat”!

“Nobody would do anything if they knew what they were in for.”
- Amarante Cordova in “The Milagro Beanfield War”

El Cabron Viejo
Time Posted: May 4, 2020 at 3:09 PM
Lynette Prelo
 
April 29, 2020 | Lynette Prelo

Tannin Talk

What is a tannin? As a wine drinker you may have heard this word, but not quite understood what it meant. Have you ever asked, "What makes my wine dry?" Here's a little lesson in tannins and the wines you will find them in.


tan•nin (noun) /ˈtanən/
a naturally occurring polyphenol found in plants, seeds, bark, wood, leaves, & fruit skins.
How do we get tannins in our wine?
We see the presence of tannins much more dominant in red wines than in white, due to several different factors. First being that the skins, seeds, and stems are usually what give wines their tannins. In red wines these tannins appear because of the process in which after a wine is pressed, the juice may sit in contact with the skins, seeds, and stems for some time extracting the tannin from them. It can also be picked up from contact with wood of the barrels used during the aging process which is more typical of red wines.
However, the question still remains: Can tannins be found in white wine or rose?  The short answer is: Yes, but typically not as potent as in red wine. When white wine is aged in barrel, (like Chardonnay) or is fermented with their skins (a Rosé), larger levels of tannin can be present.  
 
Noisy Water Wines With Great Tannin Structure
Dry Reds:
2018 Petit Verdot
2018 Petit Verdot
$30.00
This varietal is known for having great tannic structure and people around the world flock to this grape because of it's dryness. Floral notes of violet on the nose, and a deep, dark fruit middle are found in this wine. Well defined tannins and minerality lead to a black pepper and plum finish.
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2018 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon
2018 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon
$58.00
You can't talk tannin without talking about Cabernet Sauvignon. This pinnacle varietal that is judged across many categories has dark concentrated color, explosive tannins, and a backbone of complex berries and plums. Back to back 92 point scored wine, vintage 16 & 17!
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Dry Whites:
2019 Skin-Fermented Chenin Blanc
2019 Skin-Fermented Chenin Blanc
$33.00
This chardonnay is a great example of white wine. We fermented the this Chenin Blanc with the skins on giving it great color and pronounced tannins. Pear and stone fruit jump from the glass and balance out with a creamy soft tannin finish. 
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2018 Vintner's Reserve Chardonnay
2018 Vintner's Reserve Chardonnay
$27.00
This chardonnay is a great example of a wine with amazing structure. With little to no tannin extraction from the seeds or skins, only from the barrels it was aged in, it finds the perfect balance. Toasted & buttery middle with a smokey vanilla finish
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Characteristics of Tannins
  • Creates a dryness on your tongue and overall mouth feel 
  • Bitterness
  • Creates more complexity in wines
 Benefits of Tannins
  • Helps keep wine stable in the bottle, allowing for a longer shelf life  
  • Prevents bacterial growth 
  • Naturally occurring antioxidant
  • Known to benefit the heart and help with blood pressure issues 

Tannin Taste Test 

Tannins are also found in tea. Take black tea and steep it a bit longer than the recommended time.  Taste the tea after it has cooled and  you will taste a bitterness on your tongue and a dry finish, this is the presence of tannins! 
Time Posted: Apr 29, 2020 at 3:03 PM

 

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